Vegan Food Sources of Vitamin A

Pre-formed vitamin A exists only in animal products. However, there are about 50 carotenoids that the body can convert into vitamin A; the most common is beta-carotene. The vitamin A content of foods is now stated as retinol activity equivalents (RAE).

The DRI is 900 RAE for men and 700 RAE for women.

Vitamin A deficiency symptoms begin with night blindness and if it progresses can lead to the more severe eye problems of corneal ulcers, scarring, and blindness. Vitamin A deficiency also reduces immunity, and it is important for growth and development in infants and children and in red blood cell formation.

Eating vegetables high in carotenoids with some fat has been shown both to increase absorption and the amount synthesized into vitamin A.

To ensure that you are including a wide variety of foods that contain vitamin A, take a look at the charts alongside:

  1. Natural Sources of Vitamin A - Table 1 - pages 1 to 3
  2. High Vitamin a Foods by Nutrient Density
  3. Other vitamin A-Rich Foods

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Natural Sources of Vitamin A - Table 1 - page 1
Natural Sources of Vitamin A - Table 1 - page 1
Natural Sources of Vitamin A - Table 1 - page 2
Natural Sources of Vitamin A - Table 1 - page 2
Natural Sources of Vitamin A - Table 1 - page 3
Natural Sources of Vitamin A - Table 1 - page 3
High Vitamin A Foods by Nutrient Density
High Vitamin A Foods by Nutrient Density
Other Vitamin A-Rich Foods
Other Vitamin A-Rich Foods